Today's Military:

Army Reserve

The Army Reserve offers citizens the opportunity to serve near home until they are needed to deploy. Reserve Soldiers receive the same training as active-duty Soldiers. After Basic Combat Training (BCT) and Advanced Individual Training (AIT), Reserve Soldiers return to their civilian lives and spend one weekend a month drilling to keep their skills sharp. For roughly two weeks a year, Reserve Soldiers serve on Active Duty, focusing on challenging field and specialty training. They may even have the opportunity to attend competitive Army training programs such as Airborne and Air Assault schools. Reserve Soldiers may be called to Active Duty when needed.

Today’s Army Reserve is 207,086 troops strong. Service options for the Army Reserve range from three to six years.

Before Serving in the Army Reserve

To enlist in the U.S. Army, you must be between 18 and 41 years old (17 with parental consent). You cannot be older than 42 years. You must be a U.S. citizen or resident alien. A high school diploma is preferred, but a high school equivalent such as the GED may be accepted. You must also pass the ASVAB test and a physical fitness exam.

All Reserve Soldiers must complete 10 weeks of Basic Combat Training, the same boot camp attended by full-time Army Soldiers.

See more entrance requirements

Army Reserve Benefits

The Army Reserve offers many of the same benefits as the full-time Army, including fair pay for all time spent training or deployed. Reserve Soldiers develop skills and confidence, working as a team toward a larger goal. There are few experiences that have such lasting impact.

More info about Army Reserve pay

Army Reserve Careers

The Army Reserve can be a great way to develop career skills and serve our nation while maintaining a civilian career. More than 120 Reserve jobs are available for qualified applicants.

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